Tuesday, May 27, 2014

My hands are hot.

That's what a psychic told me a couple of Saturdays ago.  I was receiving a reading at my aunt's house, and the psychic informed me that my hands were hot, like red hot.  She also stated that it's because of all the healing energy I am able to give off.  My hands are my power source, my gold mine. 

Hmmm . . .

I knew I possessed healing abilities, and that the source of it came through my hands.  But I always pictured them as white and green, personally.  But, hey, if red means the same thing then I'll take it! 




Aside from massage, I also do Reiki.  And I have found that when doing Reiki my hands actually start feeling really warm and hot.  This is how I know the energy is flowing through and onto the recipient.  I've even had clients mention that to me, as well.

This afternoon I had my very first Acupuncture appointment.  And it was amazing! And of course, she placed a couple of the needles in each of my hands.  So, maybe that will help open up my healing energy even more?! I have to go back for a few more appointments over the next couple of weeks, so we will see!

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Reiki is an Energetic Massage for the Soul

     And I don't mean energetic in the sense of fast-paced or quickly moving.  Reiki is energy work.  By definition, Reiki is a form of healing where the practitioner channels universal, positive energy into the patient in order to encourage healing or restore wellbeing.
     Here at the office, we are all trained in Reiki and other forms of energy healing.  It can be done as a stand-alone treatment, or it can be introduced through Massage.  Because like the title says, it's a massage for the soul.







     Reiki has been used to help treat stress and tension, high blood pressure, pain (whether chronic or acute), and depression to name a few.  Others have used Reiki to increase their immunity and vitality, remove energy blockages, help with their spiritual growth, aid themselves during cancer treatments, and to improve their sleep.  There's many benefits to Reiki other than what has been listed here.
     But, I find not too many people know what Reiki is or have even heard of it in the first place.  It's not as "commonplace" as Massage Therapy, or Chiropractic, or yoga.  If you are interested in learning more about Reiki, or maybe you'd like to receive a treatment, you can always schedule an appointment here at the office (The Sacred Self).  Otherwise, here are some organizations to help build your knowledge base:

The International Center for Reiki Training
IARP - International Association of Reiki Professionals
The Reiki Alliance
Reiki Room
Massachusetts Reiki Community
Heart of Reiki

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Natural Living Expo

    


     This past weekend I, Marisa, Jill, and Ilisa promoted The Sacred Self at the Natural Living Expo in Marlborough.  It is one of New England's largest expos.  We were among 225 other vendors, and let me just say that the energy in the hall was amazing! It was so high and so unbelievably uplifting; everyone in there came out buzzing!

     We met a lot of great people and were able to provide them with mini Chair Massage, Reiki treatments, and Psychic Readings.  The feedback we received was positive, and we can't wait to do it again next year.  In fact, I already sent out the application for next November.  And I plan on being at this event every year for years to come.

     If you were unable to be there this year, you have to go next year.  Aside from my company being there, you will meet so many other vendors/exhibitors offering all sorts of holistic products and valuable information.  You'll even get the chance to sit in on a meditation or talk held by some of the speakers.  Even if it seems like it's a far drive, trust me, it's worth it.  :)

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Suffering from Arthritis? Get a Massage!



     As alternative therapies for arthritis are becoming more popular, people with arthritis are turning to massage to address both the pain and stiffness of their condition and their general well-being.  Perhaps you haven’t tried massage yet because you don’t know what to expect, are not sure that massage is a good idea for your joint pain and inflammation, or don’t know where to find a good massage therapist.  Well, to get you acquainted with its benefits towards arthritis, let’s first discuss what massage is.

     Massage is one of the oldest healing arts. The ancient Chinese, Egyptians, and Greeks are all known to have practiced it. Massage became accepted in the United States in the mid-1800’s, only to wane in the following century and not revive until the 1960’s and 1970’s.  Today, there are well over 100,000 massage therapists at work in the United States. They practice massage in many settings, from hospitals to health clubs to private studios.  In massage, a trained professional known as a massage therapist presses, rubs, strokes, kneads, and otherwise manipulates the muscles and soft tissues of your body.  People go to them for many different reasons: to ease pain, to rehabilitate from injury, to reduce stress, to ease anxiety and depression, and to improve general well-being.


      While there are more than 250 varieties of massage techniques, many practitioners use a form of Swedish massage, which employs long, flowing strokes meant to be calming and relaxing.  As your body becomes relaxed, the massage therapist can also apply focused pressure to relieve areas of muscular tension.  Other popular forms of massage include deep tissue massage, which features strong pressure on deeper layers of tissue, and myofascial release, in which long, stretching strokes release tension in the fascia (the connective tissue around the muscles).  There are also the Asian techniques of acupressure and shiatsu, which use finger pressure on specific points on the body, and the technique called reflexology, which holds that rubbing certain points on the feet, hands, or ears has a positive effect on various body parts.

     So, what can it do for arthritis? As it turns out, a lot! Massage carries numerous benefits.  It can aid in relaxation, which in itself promotes healing and reduces stress. It can also reduce pain, improve joint movement, relax tense muscles, and stimulate blood flow.  For people with arthritis it should be used in conjunction with (and not to replace) other regular medical treatment such as pain medicine or physical therapy. 


     The biggest benefit is relaxation.  It should bring a sense of well-being to the body.  Massage triggers the body’s parasympathetic nervous system, which encourages the body’s restorative processes — muscle tension is improved, the heart rate slows, and the fight-or-flight response is reversed.  Massage is also thought to encourage the flow of lymph in the body. (Lymph is a fluid that circulates throughout the body; the cells in lymph help fight infection and disease.) Massage can also increase the flow of blood. However, exercise actually has a greater effect on increasing circulation than massage does. And during a relaxing massage, local circulation may increase, but systemic circulation actually slows down, as evidenced by lowered blood pressure, decreased body temperature, and slower breathing. This explains why many people actually become cooler during massage.

     In a study done by the American Massage Therapy Association, 93% of people who tried massage felt it was effective for pain relief.  Researchers speculate that massage encourages the release of pain-relieving hormones or that massage may block pain signals that are sent to the brain.  Through direct pressure, massage affects the muscles and connective tissues in the body, increasing mobility.  Especially for people with arthritis, this can help increase the range of motion in the joints and lessen stiffness in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments.  Massage’s psychological benefits are well documented. Massage can alter mood, alleviating anxiety and depression and enhancing feelings of well-being and safety. Many people turn to massage for just this reason.

     Talk with your doctor about getting a massage.  There are some conditions that may be too severe for massage.  And once you have cleared your decision with your doctor, you should choose the massage therapist that feels right for you.  You may prefer male, or even female, but always make sure they are either nationally certified or properly licensed.  

Thursday, September 5, 2013

That Time of Year!

     You know it's September when the kids are back in school and parents schedules are back to their
normal routine.

     And that's a good thing! Normalcy is wonderful.  It keeps our lives on track, creates less stress (some of the time), and allows each of us some time to breathe.  So, why not take the opportunity to schedule in some "me" time?!


Schedule a massage!

     
     You know you want to.  You will have the time and opportunity to do so.  And, you will also receive 20% off for being a first time client.  So, visit us at The Sacred Self on Washington Street in Canton, MA.  We're available by appointment on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.
Check our website: www.sacredself11.com

Have a Happy September!

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Marathon Training

    

     Are you in the midst of training for a race or a marathon? Are you stretching properly, drinking lots of water, resting when you need to, and receiving a massage like you should?

     Many of you don't realize the benefits you will receive when getting a massage (or 4, 5, or 6) during your training.  Sports massage has been used to treat pain, soreness, and stiffness associated with athletic injury and training, as well as for injury prevention.  It is believed to potentially increase blood flow to the muscles, decrease swelling, reduce muscle tension, and increase a sense of well-being.  Studies have shown that massage can reduce lactate levels in muscle, diminish delayed onset muscle soreness, and improve muscle function in certain settings.

     That said, deep tissue massage is certainly not for everyone the week before the marathon.  If routine massage treatments have not been a part of your regular training regimen, it is not advisable to schedule any deep tissue work this close to the big day.  You are not familiar with how your body would respond, and it may adversely affect your taper.  In general, it is a good rule not to try anything new in the last week leading up to a marathon.

     If you do schedule a massage within a week or two of the race, make sure to keep it semi-light—a relaxation therapeutic massage may be appropriate.  This would primarily serve as a psychological benefit to ease tension and stress, but don’t expect it to fix any injuries or muscle imbalances at that point.  Studies have shown that pre-race massage doesn’t necessarily improve muscle strength, flexibility, or endurance, but it can contribute to a positive mental outlook as race day approaches.
Before scheduling, seek out a licensed massage therapist with experience treating runners.  You can search for practices specializing in sports, clinical, or rehabilitation massage.  Also, let the therapist know that you are running the marathon on Sunday. 

     And when the race, or marathon, is all over, be sure to schedule a post-race massage! Your body will feel fatigued, possibly sore, and hopefully not injured.  Receiving a relaxing massage during the week after a race will help put you back in tip-top shape.  

     And in case you are wondering, our therapists at The Sacred Self are trained to massage athletes.  So, if you would like to add massage to your training regimen, please contact us for an appointment.  We would be more than happy to help you out!
 

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

A Pictorial Tour of the Office!

Let's update, shall we? It's been a month or so since I last posted.  My office is open and looking great!.  And on Saturday July27th I will be holding a Grand Opening/Open House.  But, so let's take a look at what my office looks like!

This is the front of the building on the corner of Sherman and Washington.


 Also the front corner of the building.  My office is right behind the flag pole.  My sign is under the other business'.


 This is behind the building, in the parking lot.  This entrance is used as the main entrance.  The door is up and to the left.


 This is what you see when you walk into the main door.  To get to the office, go to the end of the hallway and turn right.


 And this is what you'll see! Welcome! Come on in.


Open the door to the reception room.


 Don't you just love the Buddha fountain?


 And to the right is a small hallway.  Bathroom door is on the right across from the Readings room.


 And here we have the Readings room.  I'd like to give it a name.  Any suggestions?


 Further inside the Readings room.  It has great energy!


 Out in the small hallway is a bulletin board full of business cards and information! 


 Here's the first massage room.  It's called Serene Gardens.


 The smaller hallway between the two massage rooms.


And lastly, the other massage room.  It's called Tranquil Waters.